Barrett’s Esophagus:

Barrett’s Esophagus:

It is a condition in which there is an abnormal change in the tissues of the tube connecting the mouth and the stomach, and the lower part of the esophagus. In Barrett’s esophagus, normal tissues are replaced by different tissues. This change is called metaplasia. It is known to occur in people with chronic GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). Barrett’s esophagus (a premalignant stage) is associated with the incidence of esophageal cancer (adenocarcinoma). Though this condition does not show any kind of symptoms, trouble swallowing, and chest pain, blood in stools, tarry stools, and coffee colored vomit are some visible ones. Barrett’s esophagus occurs because of chronic inflammation that is caused due to acidity, biliousness, and pancreatic contents. People with excess abdominal fat are more prone to this condition as the contents of the stomach go back to the esophagus. Smoking and frequent usage of anti-inflammatory drugs also increase the risk. The condition is diagnosed by an endoscopy, and biopsy. Treatment to this condition is provided by prescribing medications like proton pump inhibitors, and H2-receptor antagonists. Sometimes surgical procedures are also prescribed. People with type 2 diabetes are at a higher risk of developing Barrett’s esophagus and so have to work on reducing their weight.

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