Brachial Palsy:

Brachial Palsy:

Also known as brachial plexus palsy, brachial palsy is a condition of the brachial plexus nerves wherein there is paralysis due to an injury to the brachial plexus. The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that runs from the spine through the back of the neck, the armpit, and to through the upper arm. Brachial palsy can be upper brachial palsy where the upper part of the brachial plexus gets paralyzed and lower brachial palsy where the lower part of the brachial plexus gests paralyzed. The upper brachial palsy is called Erb’s Palsy and the lower brachial palsy is called Klumpke palsy. This injury is common in infants due to obstetric trauma, tumors, inflammation, and shoulder trauma. Symptoms of this condition include lack of muscle movement in the upper or lower arm, paralysis of the arm, lack of movement in the arm and the wrist, and lack of sensation. This condition can cause disabilities like impaired range of motion, loss of function, and clawed hand. Brachial palsy is known to be caused in newborns due to shoulder dystocia (the shoulder does not come out after the head during delivery. This is an obstetric emergency) during difficult childbirth. Shoulder dystocia is caused due to fetal macrosomia (See: Macrosomia) where the weight and length of the fetus is higher. This is often the case in pregnant women with gestational diabetes. Diagnosis of this condition is done by an EMG and treatment of this condition involves physical therapy, orthosis, and in certain cases surgery.

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