Blood clot:

Blood clot:

Also known as coagulation, blood clotting is a vital process of the body that prevents excessive blood loss or bleeding in case of an injury to the blood vessel. Blood clots are cells of blood that have formed into a semisolid state and it can lead to conditions like deep vein thrombosis (See: Deep vein thrombosis). Blood clotting happens plasma and proteins in the blood work together at the spot of the injury. Blood clots normally dissolve once the injury or the wound heals and most of the time blood clots are immobile. Immobile blood clots are generally harmless. However, when blood clots occur in blood vessels (in arteries or veins), it can pose a risk. Clots that form in the veins or arteries sometimes get transported through the bloodstream into the lungs or the heart. If the blood clot gets lodged in the lungs, it is called pulmonary embolism (See: Pulmonary embolism). If the blood clot enters an artery supplying blood to the brain, it causes ischemic stroke (See: Ischemic stroke). When it enters the heart, it can cause a heart attack. If the blood clot forms in the deep veins of the legs or arms, it causes peripheral artery disease. Excessive coagulation or blood clotting is called hypercoagulation. This happens in people who smoke, who are overweight, who have a genetic predisposition, and people who lead sedentary lifestyles. People with diabetes are at an increased risk of the formation of blood clots along with the risk of formation of plaque. Increased blood sugar levels tend to create abnormalities in the process of coagulation. It creates an imbalance in the formation of the thrombus, and its dissolution leading to more blood clots. High blood sugar levels also causes oxidative stress on the cells of the body leading to hypercoagulation and its related diseases.

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